Maria Bustilllos offers it up:

Bohemian values of inventiveness and not-so-much-materialism are particularly helpful to have just now in the U.S. Because there has been way too much materialism over the last fifty years, new ways of looking at “success” and so on are badly needed. It would be great if, instead of excoriating the hipsters, people took a serious look at how they like to live, and maybe tried some of the things they like, for example riding a bicycle instead of driving a fancy car, or trying a vegan diet, or learning to play music. If we could broaden the idea of excellence to include more than wealth and power-to include cultural fluency, invention and new experiencesit could be such a good thing.

This is also a reason why now should be a great moment for real religious faith: Christianity's indifference to worldly goods (not Christianism's, of course), the serenity Buddhism offers in the face of life's tribulations, Judaism's emphasis on charity, and so on ... these are values that temper the stress of recession or sudden insecurity or poverty. And yet, we see so much fundamentalism - which is about control over others, not serenity in oneself, and neurotic false certainty not doubt-filled wonder at the ineffability of the divine.

Not just hipsters, but hippies. Their time has come again.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.