A reader writes:

Your liberal readers and bloggers decry the unfairness that gives advantages to the rich, and there is no doubt that life is unfair.  I agree with you that the rich should pay higher taxes than the poor - although I also find the flat tax very appealing. But the liberal ideal of equalizing things is also unfair, let’s be honest. 

The government can’t “repair” the unfairness that exists in the world, and too much effort to do so will do nothing but shift the unfairness.  Perhaps liberals are fine with that, as so many seem to hate the rich, but it seems to me that the best goal is simply try not to be unfair - to anyone.  Yes, this means there will be rich and poor, and some governmental actions are certainly justified, but liberal ideas of punishing the successful are themselves selfish, mean, and doomed to failure, as I’m afraid we’ll see soon if we go too far down this road.

By the way: I’m currently unemployed and have been looking for a job for some time.  I’m in my fifties and figure that, since I’ve used up my savings, I will never be able to retire.  But I don’t want to punish the rich.  Liberals would take money from the rich and bail me out, but they would also take freedom from all of us.  Thanks, but no thanks.  I’d rather work until I die.

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