The average social cost of a single murder is more than $17.2 million, according to a new study (PDF). Christina Hernandez interviewed study author Matt DeLisi on the goal of the research:

There is a large and vibrant prevention world that tries to identify at-risk youth and at-risk families and provide some modestly-costing social services that will try to push kids out of risky or at-risk environments into more normative or pro-social environments.

I’m hoping these monetization studies show the end result of what happens if we allow crime to go over to a lengthy criminal career. My hope is that this information because no one wants to pay for these costs, let alone endure all the victimization provides an incentive to continue to invest in prevention.

(Hat tip: Maureen O'Connor)

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