Mark Oppenheimer is upset that Yale is collaborating with Singapore:

Now, look, I know that the USA tortures people in wartime, and of course openly executes people. We are no saints. But the question is whether Yale wants to get into bed with this country. Furthermore, I know that there is an argument that one way to increase openness and democracy in foreign countries is to bring our open institutions to them I very much hope that is what Yale officials are thinking when the offer polite, noncontroversial, obsequious welcomes to visiting Chinese dignitaries, giving them a free pass on many of their worst human-rights offenses.

Nonetheless, I will be awaiting Yale's answer to whether any books will be banned on the Singapore campus (one official has promised to discuss this with me when she returns from a trip). I will await further elaboration on just how much freedom the profs there will have. And, while we're at it, I would love to know what President Levin, Dean Mary Miller, and other officials think of caning. I asked those two in e-mails, and in the last several hours have not heard back, but certainly will post if I do. Let's be frank: I believe they oppose caning. But if they cannot say so, or if they think it rude to say so while Yale is negotiating with Singapore, then something has been lost.

The Yale Daily News has more.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.