Morgan Meis stops trying to understand Fellini and learns to love the oddity of it all:

What makes La Dolce Vita realism is that it gives you the strange straight up, in the same way that we do, in fact, experience strange and extraordinary things all the time. The events of our lives always fail to resolve themselves into tidy explanations.

In the last scene of La Dolce Vita, Marcello and a band of misfit revelers and partygoers wander out onto the beach where a giant, squid-like creature has washed up to shore. Everyone gawks at the creature for a little while and then goes away. The scene is arresting and disturbing, just like the rest of the movie. When you step away from the scene in the attempt at analysis, it fades away. So don't. Just watch in stunned silence at the dead empty eyes of the beast, and the dead empty eyes of Marcello as he wanders off dashing, handsome, and utterly unsure about what he is supposed to do with what he has just seen.

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