Today on the Dish, Andrew shared Beinart and Goldblog's regret for what Israel should have done, instead of failing to extend the settlment freeze. Homocon misstepped with Coulter's off-color jokes, Andrew Sprung predicted Obama would be the transformative president he promised to be and Andrew agreed. Stephen Colbert wasn't joking about his Catholic faith and defending "the least of his brothers."

Gideon Levy tried to rehumanize the plight of Palestinians in Israel, Ahmadinejad clowned around, living with HIV in Haiti meant hiding the truth, and Joe Klein informed Obama most civilians won't mind if he dials back in Afghanistan.

Paladino continued to ride the horse of race-baiting, Boehner didn't want to talk about fiscal solutions, and Larison envisioned a Romney run. Exum tried to play gotcha with Andrew on double standards for the military but, like the AEI after Gordon Adams was done with them, was shot down. Torture was still redacted in the New York Times, drug czar Bill Bennett conflated hedonism with healing, but polling on Prop 19 improved. Bernstein asserted the constitution's primacy in our politics today, and Congress wanted to curb liberties on every communication device possible.

Urban planning insulted people's living rooms, Mary Elizabeth Williams saw porn everywhere, and a reader and bicyclist rebelled against Felix Salmon's read on road rage. Yglesias relished aiming low, Dan's project spread, and VFYW here, MHB here, Map of the Day here, FOTD here, academic beard migrations here, and reader reactions to the Read On feature here. Lehrer let us see the world through infants' eyes, and Katherine Dalton learned everything she need to know from living in a small town.

--Z.P.

 

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