Today on the Dish, Andrew fisked both parties on the looming fiscal crisis. Larison countered him and called it political poison. Andrew needled Goldblog on Israeli settlements, rejected Cowen's predictions of a backlash against marriage equality and marijuana, and slammed Jonah Goldberg on education reform.

Immigration reform might actually include gay men and women, Rob Tisinai pulverized NOM on Prop 8, McWhorter urged Long to come out, and Dan Savage's project could teach a lesson to school officials. Ben Adler and Ramesh Ponnuru debated the GOP's Pledge to reference each bill's Constitutional justification and Obama couldn't convince Massie on his assasination program. DeMint might fill the Palin vacuum, conspiracy theorists established their own "fact checks," and Larison critiqued Limbaugh on mass American culture. Matt Steinglass argued for raising the recruitment age for war, pot legalization could save the budget, and a stable of today's thinkers reacted to the question of what future generations will condemn us for.  

Colbert made Catholics proud, atheists schooled everyone on religious history, and Michael Klarman argued that we as a country, moreso than the Constitution, determine the world we live in. Wetlands are endangered, and even the VFYW was subject to history's cruel lessons. Readers corrected the record on booing Palin, and on the first Hispanic quarterback.

We played with model-morphosis, secretive texting endangered lives, and Don Draper's sexy shoulders signaled the end of men. Hewitt award here, VFYW here, MHB here, and FOTD here, and Dissent of the Day here.

--Z.P.

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