Tim Cavanaugh argues that protestors in Bell, California are kindred spirits to the tea partiers, though they don't fit the stereotype:

The Bell activists are Latino Democrats, largely Spanish-speaking, less than fully marinated in small-government sensibilities and inclined to believe, as activist leader Cristina Garcia puts it here, that "for the most part the government works."

Yet there they are, protesting not just excessive taxation but excessive spending.

They are exercised about the very same thing -- being preyed upon by a self-enriching public-sector bishopric -- that motivates the Tea Partiers. And with the city government facing a massive general fund shortfall and destroyed credit, they can't avoid the deadly question "What will you cut?"

Speculating about why most Californians are immune to the Tea Parties, despite the dysfunction in the Golden State, he posits, "The weather’s nice, there’s abundant high-quality weed, and if you don’t have to think about politicians why would you?"  He isn't alone in thinking so.

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