Jesse Bering explores the science behind identifying childhood behaviors as gay. Some advice to concerned parents:

[It’s] important to stress that since genetic success is weighed in evolutionary biological terms as the relative percentage of one’s genes that carry over into subsequent generationsrather than simply number of offspring per sethere are other, though typically less profitable, ways for your child to contribute to your overall genetic success than humdrum sexual reproduction.

For example, I don’t know how much money or residual fame is trickling down to, say, k.d. lang, Elton John and Rachel Maddow’s close relatives, but I can only imagine that these straight kin are far better off in terms of their own reproductive opportunities than they would be without a homosexual dangling so magnificently on their family trees.

The very thought of making love to a blood relative of Michelangelo or Hart Crane, irrespective of anything else about that person save his heritage, makes me strangely and instantly arousedand I’d imagine such a person would be eminently desirable to heterosexually fecund women as well. So here’s my message: Cultivate your little prehomosexual’s native talents and your ultimate genetic payoff could, strangely enough, be even larger with one very special gay child than it would if ten mediocre straight offspring leapt from your loins.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.