The Dish noted last week that Christine O'Donnell's lesbian sister had a Facebook page in which she revealed the following:

I have studied and practiced many therapeutic methods, as well as many different spiritual practices, such as; The Eastern Philosophies of Buddhism, Taoism, Sidha yoga with Brahma khumaris and other yoga practices for self realization. Western philosophies of Christianity, Science of mind, Course in miracles, Catholicism, Native American Spiritualities, Judaism, Muslim, Sufi, Ancient Alchemy of the Emerald Tablet, Metaphysics, Wicca, Pagan and many other world spiritualities.

(My italics). Thanks to good old Bill Maher, we now also know that O'Donnell herself "dabbled in witchdraft" in her own words (see above). Again, one has to remember how uncannily close to Sarah Palin this makes her. Palin too believes in the reality of witchcraft and its power, even though, like O'Donnell in the Maher clip, she sees it as evil:

The video shows Palin standing before Bishop Thomas Muthee in the pulpit of the Wasilla Assembly of God church, holding her hands open as he asked Jesus Christ to keep her safe from "every form of witchcraft." "Come on, talk to God about this woman. We declare, save her from Satan," Muthee said as two attendants placed their hands on Palin's shoulders.

Karl Rove actually says O'Donnell needs to explain her remarks on this. Does Karl Rove think Sarah Palin should have explained what she was doing being given a special blessing to protect her from witchcraft? For a good laugh, Michelle Malkin defends O'Donnell here. Other right-wing bloggers are now calling Karl Rove "a DC talking head few people give a damn about." Powerline's John Hinderaker says:

I'm sorry, but politics is not about snatching random people out of the crowd and making them one of 100 United States Senators.

Really? How about a 40 hour Google search that gave us Sarah Palin? Seriously, how can you see O'Donnell as unacceptable because she is a raving, unqualified media whore ... and have Sarah Palin as your front-runner for the nomination? What exactly is the difference between them, as far as being qualified to be a Senator, let alone a president?

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