220px-Keep_Calm_and_Carry_On_Poster.svg

James Fallows quotes George Friedman's essay "The Nine Year War" as a brave assessment of where we've been and where we're going on this anniversary of 9/11:

Let me state a more radical thesis: The threat of terrorism cannot become the singular focus of the United States. Let me push it further: The United States cannot subordinate its grand strategy to simply fighting terrorism even if there will be occasional terrorist attacks on the United States. Three thousand people died in the 9/11 attack. That is a tragedy, but in a nation of over 300 million, 3,000 deaths cannot be permitted to define the totality of national strategy. Certainly, resources must be devoted to combating the threat and, to the extent possible, disrupting it. But it must also be recognized that terrorism cannot always be blocked, that terrorist attacks will occur and that the world's only global power cannot be captive to this single threat.

Fallows continues the discussion in a later post. I recommend Fareed's latest as well.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.