Kos defends his thesis (that the American right is comparable to the Taliban) against Serwer's crticism. This simply sounds paranoid:

There is a massive nationwide shortage of ammunition in the United States, as right-wing fanatics horde ammunition and guns. In fact, the weapons sector may be the healthiest in this current economy. They can't build bullets fast enough to satiate their desire to arm up. A few of these crazies have actually opened fire (detailed in the book), another flew his plane into an IRS building in a suicide mission. You can argue these are isolated incidents, or you can see them for what they are – worrying signs for an increasingly agitated and militant opposition. When you have Sharron Angle, the GOP nominee for Senate in Nevada, arguing that if the GOP fails to take Congress, they may have to resort to "Second Amendment remedies", then you have to take this stuff seriously.

I have no doubt that there are very worrying signs of potential violence and unrest on the far right, and agree that the distinction between the far right and the mainstream right is becoming close to indecipherable. But the leap from that to equating them with the Taliban remains absurd and offensive.

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