Forbes says it fact-checked Dinesh D'Souza's racist smear piece on President Obama.

On Thursday, the magazine issued a minor correction on its Web site, saying that Mr. D’Souza had “slightly misquoted” Mr. Obama from a speech he gave about the BP oil spill. Mr. D’Souza also said that Mr. Obama did not focus in the speech on “cleanup strategies.” Forbes’ correction stated, “Obama’s speech did discuss concrete measures to investigate the oil spill and bring it under control.” The Forbes spokeswoman said that the correction put an end to the magazine’s review of the matter.

Apparently the magazine's fact-checkers aren't very thorough. Here is a passage from D'Souza's article:

A good way to discern what motivates Obama is to ask a simple question: What is his dream? Is it the American dream? Is it Martin Luther King's dream? Or something else? It is certainly not the American dream as conceived by the founders. They believed the nation was a "new order for the ages." A half-century later Alexis de Tocqueville wrote of America as creating "a distinct species of mankind." This is known as American exceptionalism. But when asked at a 2009 press conference whether he believed in this ideal, Obama said no. America, he suggested, is no more unique or exceptional than Britain or Greece or any other country.

And here is President Obama at that 2009 press conference:

I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism. I’m enormously proud of my country and its role and history in the world.

If you think about the site of this summit and what it means, I don’t think America should be embarrassed to see evidence of the sacrifices of our troops, the enormous amount of resources that were put into Europe postwar, and our leadership in crafting an Alliance that ultimately led to the unification of Europe. We should take great pride in that.

And if you think of our current situation, the United States remains the largest economy in the world. We have unmatched military capability. And I think that we have a core set of values that are enshrined in our Constitution, in our body of law, in our democratic practices, in our belief in free speech and equality, that, though imperfect, are exceptional.

In other words, when asked whether he believed in that ideal, Obama said yes. Matt Yglesias calls fact-checking useless. In this case, a capable fact-checking would've corrected a major error.

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