Yglesias defends chain restaurants from a public health standpoint:

Since they have scale and standardization, you can get them to disclose nutritional information and many already do so to at least some extent voluntarily. What’s more, there’s nothing impossible in principle with the idea of a chain serving organic foodI get salads from these guys all the time. And with large chains and brands it’s actually feasible to monitor the claims people are making about their supply chain. It’s pretty well known at this point that a lot of “big organic” stuff is in many ways fraudulent, but the whole reason we know that is that we’re talking about large-scale producers whose operations people took the time to look into.

Sure, McDonald's, Chili's, The Cheesecake Factory, and countless other chains disclose their nutritional information - and their customers ignore it. Meanwhile, they're serving enormous portions of relatively unhealthy food. The public health benefits seem rather theoretical.

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