by Zoe Pollock

Wired's Lisa Grossman reports that the solar system may be almost two million years older than we believed, based on the "fairly messed up" meteorite which scientists originally used to calculate the date. Co-authors of a new study Audrey Bouvier and Meenakshi Wadhwa found a more pristine meteorite to work with, NWA 2364:

“Most of what shaped the formation history of the solar system, and the planets and asteroids and all that, a lot of that happened within the first 5 to 10 million years,” she said. “Being able to actually pinpoint to within something like 2 million years what the age of the solar system is does make a difference in terms of trying to resolve the sequence of events that happened subsequently.”

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