Andy McCarthy argues that sharia is the biggest foreign policy threat faced by the United States. But, in a move that his namesake would have loved, the threat no longer just comes from al Qaeda, but from Islamists under the bed:

Some Islamists employ mass-murder attacks while others prefer a gradual march through our institutions our legal, political, academic, and financial systems, as well as our broader culture; the goal of both, though, is the same. The stealth Islamists occasionally feign outrage at the terrorists, but their quarrel is over methodology and pace. Both camps covet the same outcome.

So we're slam-back in the 1950s, with American Muslims in general as the new reds. What to do about it? Uh-oh:

Will that entail an ambitious project to democratize Islamic countries notwithstanding that sharia dictates waging jihad against Westerners who try? Gingrich’s embrace of President Bush’s second inaugural address suggests that he may think so. How we go about it and whether we use our military to spearhead a “forward march of freedom” are matters the former speaker did not flesh out.

So the basic plan is 50 years or more of nation-building via the military, as conceived by George W. Bush. What could go wrong?

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