by Patrick Appel

Tony Woodlief attends the burial of a friend's child. Woodlief lost his own daughter a few years back:

It is a hard cruel thing, closing the lid on your child’s coffin. What no one tells you is that in the months and years to come, people will forget, but you will not. Something in you has died as well, and it awaits resurrection with your child’s body. You will carry this hole in you all your days, and there are no words or heavenly equations to make it good, not so long as you breathe while your child does not.

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