by Conor Friedersdorf

In an interview with The Economist, Jay Rosen says a lot that's true.

Examples:

-- "I do not think journalists should "join the team". They bridle at that, for good reason. Power-seeking and truth-seeking are different behaviours, and this is how we distinguish politics from journalism."

-- "When both parties are closed to certain ideas, the news system becomes closed to them, too. Not good."

-- "Victor Navasky, the former publisher of the Nation, likes to say that there's an ideology of the left, an ideology of the right, and an ideology of the centre. The news system is on guard against too much left or too much right. It is defenseless against any excesses in the ideology of the centre. There you can be as extreme or didactic as you like."

-- "The media establishment is being shocked into awareness of how fragile its authority and franchise are. Through the fallen gates stream bad actors, good people with no talent, young people who won't wait, smart people who don't need anyone's permission to publish, the people formerly known as your sources, assorted charlatans, paranoids, shysters and fools, and the obsessives who will probably discover the next press."

You can read the whole thing here.

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