But without the torture. This is a description of a prison in Mississippi:

Inmates were locked in permanent solitary confinement. In the summer, the cells were ovens, with no fans or air circulation... The cells were also sewers, thanks to a design flaw in cellblock toilets that often flushed excrement from one cell into the next. Prisoners were allowed outside -- to pace or sit alone in metal cages -- just two or three times a week. Inside was a perpetual dusk: One always-on light fixture provided inadequate light for reading but enough light to make it hard to sleep. Then there were the bugs... Worst of all, though, was the noise. Psychotic inmates screamed through the night.

And this is the story of how the ACLU and prison administrators successfully joined forces to reform it.

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