Dave Carter reports from the road:

As a study of the exotic, it's hard to beat the average truck stop. Taken as a group, truckers are an eclectic bunch. There are a huge number of veterans like yours truly, for whom trucking has enough similarities to a deployment to make it a comfortable fit. There are the cowboy types, complete with hats, belt buckles, pointy-toed boots, and a steely-eyed stare that would turn the Marlboro Man into a first class bed wetter. We have biker types complete with chained wallets and leather everything. We've got couples who decided to tour the country together, and people who elected to escape the Dilbert hell of the office cubicle and acquaint themselves with manual labor. Walking into most truck stops for the first time, you might wonder if you had stumbled upon a Village People convention, or chastise yourself for not bringing any Halloween candy. You could rope us off and charge admission just to watch.

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