by Zoe Pollock

Tracy Clark-Flory rejoiced after science finally confirmed her long held belief that hookup culture doesn't kill off all chances for love:

University of Iowa sociologist Anthony Paik's survey of 642 adults in Chicago initially found that "average relationship quality was higher for individuals who waited until things were serious to have sex compared to those who became sexually involved in 'hookups,' 'friends with benefits,' or casual dating relationships," according to a press release. But when he controlled for people who had zero interest in having a relationship, that difference disappeared. "Couples who became sexually involved as friends or acquaintances and were open to a serious relationship ended up just as happy as those who dated and waited."

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