by Patrick Appel

A reader writes:

This whole "controversy" has really upset me, but one of the elements that seems to be repeated or at least taken as truth without apparent verification is the feelings of "the 9/11 families". I know that there are some outspoken relatives of 9/11 victims, but it seems to me ridiculous to ascribe feelings to a certain, amorphous group of people. Who qualifies as a "9/11 family"? Grandparents of victims? Brothers-in-law? Cousins? Good friends? Or just husbands/wives/children? Who has taken a poll of every single of these people (whether you use the most or least restrictive guidelines). It just seems ludicrous to give so much weight to what essentially boils down to a straw man. And even if we were able to quantify the feelings of each and every person related to a victim, would we still want to give that more weight than the people who actually live in Manhattan or NYC?

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