A reader writes:

Not to defend Deepak Chopra, but Michael Shermer is just plain wrong when he asserts that Quantum Mechanics is not relevant to ordinary life and the notion of a objective, Newtonian reality. I suggest you read this very astute article on the work of Anton Zeilinger, one of the leading quantum physicists of our time. He explains how the old model of QM has been broken by experimental results, and that it really does imply that objective reality can no longer be considered valid even for large, everyday objects. 

Another writes:

I can't speak to the Chopra's arguments, nor to Shermer's larger rebuttal, but when the latter writes, "But the world of subatomic particles has no correspondence with the world of Newtonian mechanics," he isn't really accurate and I don't think it forms a solid basis of rebuttal.  Quantum mechanics describes results of Newtonian calculations accurately at scale.  It's true that two different mathematics are at work, and that Newtonian mechanics cannot describe quantum systems, but quantum mechanics can accurately describe Newtonian systems.

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