Fareed Zakaria puts his money where his mouth is and returns an ADL award. I hope it starts a trend. They must have given many awards to many distinguished people. Those who believe in freedom of religion should, in my view, follow Fareed's example. Money quote:

[D]oes Foxman believe that bigotry is OK if people think they’re victims? Does the anguish of Palestinians, then, entitle them to be anti-Semitic?

Foxman digs in:

If the stated goal was to advance reconciliation and understanding, we believe taking into consideration the feelings of many victims and their families, of first responders and many New Yorkers, who are not bigots but still feel the pain of 9/11, would go a long way to achieving that reconciliation.

Greg Sargent interjects:

The "stated" goal, eh? ... This goes considerably further than ADL's initial statement, which didn't question the motives behind the center. In other words, this is no longer just about the feelings of those still wounded by 9/11, as ADL initially claimed. With this response, ADL has strayed even further from its own stated mission. After all, the group says its "ultimate purpose" is to "put an end forever to unjust and unfair discrimination against and ridicule of any sect or body of citizens."

The ADL is becoming a force in our society for the promotion of bigotry. It should be renamed the Muslim Defamation League.

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