by Patrick Appel

Marc Lynch's contribution to the Iran-Israel debate is worth reading in full. A taste:

Israel, according to Goldberg, wants the world to share its perception of the Iranian threat and to act in concert. But again, if Israel's leadership genuinely believes that Iran poses the greatest existential threat that Israel has ever faced, and that it needs the world to accept its perspective that it is the world's problem and not just Israel's, then why has it taken so many steps over the last year and a half to alienate the world and to isolate itself? If it truly felt such existential urgency, then wouldn't it be willing to make concessions on Gaza or the peace process in order to build international support and sympathy?

Goldberg focuses on a related paragraph.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.