TNC lands some blows:

One reason that black people grimace at invocations of their history to justify the struggle du jour, is because, very often, the invokers really don't know what the fuck they are talking about. Put bluntly they have no deep knowledge of the black struggle, and are not seeking any. For them, black history is a rhetorical device, employed to pummel their ideological foes, and then promptly discarded for more appropriate instruments.

E.D. Kain defends himself and TNC pounces again:

I am sure that, in some ways, the Holocaust is like the Middle Passage. I am also sure that, in some ways, the Holocaust and the Middle Passage are like pet euthanasia. I'm also sure that all three are somehow like a steak dinner. And so on. If your mission is to make yourself right, there are an abundance of pathways.

But if you're mission is to clarify your own thinking, and understand the experiences of other people, then you tend to shy away from defending analogies which, by your own lights, are "full of holes and designed to inflame more than enlight."  Sometimes, you go so far down into a hole, and you forget why, and how, you got there.

Kain won't relent on his core point about the personhood of fetuses.

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