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by Zoe Pollock

Today's poem comes from the Atlantic's expansive archive of poetry. We hope to dig through it regularly and feature a couple of gems every week. Here is an excerpt of 'The Bear Hunt' by Abraham Lincoln:

And round, and round the chase now goes,
            The world ’s alive with fun;
Nick Carter’s horse his rider throws,
            And Mose Hill drops his gun.

Now, sorely pressed, bear glances  back,
            And lolls his tired tongue,
When as, to force him from his track
            An ambush on him sprung.

Across the glade he sweeps for flight,
            And fully is in view
The dogs, new fired by the sight
            Their cry and speed renew.

The foremost ones now reach his rear;
            He turns, they dash away,
And circling now the wrathful bear
            They have him full at bay.

The history of the president's verse-writing and the full poem can be found here.

(Photo from Flickr user Schristia)

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