A reader writes:

I am a Presbyterian Pastor, and your blog archive has become a go-to resource for sermon illustrations. For example, this week my sermon touched on the issue of suffering - and sure enough, a search of your archives (via Google, not the dismal Atlantic site search function) pointed me to a several posts on Bart Ehrman and the role of suffering in his journey from faith to agnosticism. It provided a relevant, real-time example of the struggle with suffering and the role of the cross in God's response to a suffering world.

It's worth mentioning that a straight Google search of "suffering" turns up a cluttered mess. Your choice of blog posts serves as a human filter of the flood of information on the internet that no quant equation can compete with. The internet is a grand experiment in unintended consequences and I thought you'd be interested in one more example of how it is changing our relationship to information and narrative.

We are chuffed. And we hope soon to begin to compile pages of Dish links and posts on various subjects and collect various threads together to make this process more possible. I find the Dish a resource as well. For my other writing and thinking, or just researching, there is almost always something in the Dish archives that can help. That's not just because of our editing. It's because we've come to see this blogazine as an efficient way to congregate the thoughts and knowledge of an increasingly impressive collective mind.

That would be you.

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