by Chris Bodenner

A reader writes:

Back in March, my husband went home to Nowshera, Pakistan to visit.  He took many photos, one of which you featured on March 16th as The View From Your Window. Thankfully, despite Image010the massive flooding in Pakistan, that view is still the same.  Our family was very lucky to have all survived the flooding.  Since they  live far enough from the river, their house was spared.  My brother-in-law lost his shop, another brother-in-law lost a vehicle, and one sister-in-law’s family lost their home, but they are staying with our family.  We feel so blessed and lucky right now!

My husband became a US citizen on July 23rd.  I couldn’t be more proud and thankful that he has chosen to be an American.  I just get the feeling that so much of the anti-Muslim sentiment in this country is due to lack of experience and engagement with Muslims.  Everywhere we have lived in this country, whether through chance meetings or through his business, my husband has left a positive impression of Muslims with our customers and new friends.  This level of engagement is vital to changing perceptions, including the perceptions of some of my own family members.  Of all our customers (he has a moving company), it is military men and women who are the most open, accepting, and excited to talk to a Pashtun American.

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