A reader writes:

Your reader writes:

I've been smashed in the face to the point of having my front teeth chipped.  Along with that kind of trauma comes cut and severely swollen lips, gum damage, and the inability to smile like she is in the photo

A blow directly to the mouth that breaks teeth is indeed likely to significantly injure the lips.  However, that is certainly not the only type of blow that may result in chipped or broken teeth.  A blow to the lower jaw, for instance, may cause the lower and upper teeth to hit each other with enough force to chip several teeth, while leaving the lips completely uninjured.

I'm not a dentist, but I am an emergency physician, and I have seen a lot of patients come to the ER because of a broken tooth.  Sometimes they have lip or gum damage, and sometimes they don't.

Another reader:

That reader really has gone out on a limb.  In my youth, I chipped my four front teeth after having drunk too much (I fell and apparently had my mouth open when I hit the ground causing my four top teeth to take the entire impact).  I had no lacerations on my face or any other injuries except my bruised ego.  I got up, dusted myself off and continued my evening.  Of course the next day, I was cussing myself out, especially after getting the bill from my dentist.  Note, I do not have buck teeth nor an overly sized mouth.  It was just one of those freak accidents that happen all too often when inebriated.

A final reader:

I think that it is outrageous for someone to assert those pictures are fake. If you look at the picture, you can see her swollen lip. If there was broken skin, it could have been on the inside of the mouth, she could have cleaned it up a bit, she could have taken the pictures several hours after the injury. The benefit of the doubt obviously has to go with Oksana, and given the incredibly nasty phone calls, those recordings reveal exactly the kind of abuse and invective that a domestic abuser would use. It's not a far reach to think he'd slug a woman.

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