John Dickerson assesses the all-vent-no-solutions campaign gearing up for the fall:

Both sides are focusing on highlighting just how bad the other party is in part because they can't satisfy voter anger by talking about solutions. People aren't in a mood to believe in promises from Washington. And, for different reasons, neither party has much to say. Democrats can't excite people with the programs they've passed. Only 33 percent of those asked in a recent Pew poll think the stimulus bill has helped create jobs. Health care reform is getting more popular, but even in the most optimistic polls, less than 50 percent of respondents view it favorably. Republicans aren't offering detailed solutions because they have made a tactical decision to stay vague about what they would actually do if they took control. They don't want to offend anyone, and they'd prefer this election be a referendum on unpopular Democratic programs.

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