I will, in part to piss him off. I don't believe in treating the sick as suddenly tender souls who cannot enjoy humor and debate - and that would apply in truckloads for my dear friend. I'm delighted that no one ever pulls a punch with me on the grounds of chronic disease and I'm sure Hitch would feel the same way. Goldblog meditates with pitch-perfect tone on this conundrum. Money quote:

This matter of theology brought to mind one of my favorite theologians, our mutual friend Rabbi David Wolpe, who has debated Hitch on innumerable occasions on the question of God's existence or non-existence. I asked David what sort of intercessory praying a believer should do on behalf of a declared non-believer, or if one should pray at all, and he wrote back with some very wise words: "I would say it is appropriate and even mandatory to do what one can for another who is sick; and if you believe that praying helps, to pray.  It is in any case an expression of one's deep hopes.  So yes, I will pray for him, but I will not insult him by asking or implying that he should be grateful for my prayers."

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