by Patrick Appel

Poulos doubts Kazin's theory:

For it to happen, the GOP would have to (1) produce a leading contender for the nomination who is both (2) unacceptable to Palinites and (3) a man Palin doesn't like personally, doesn't owe any favors, and can't promote to her advantage (let's not kid ourselves: Palin wouldn't veto a woman even if she could). I just don't see that narrow, complex scenario playing out in any event. Palin's ability to shape the party from its margins will likely remain significant but marginal. McCarthy made his impact from deep within his party; Wallace made his (and these are not my preferred Palin analogues, not by a longshot) from far outside it. Palin is a woman who endorsed Carly Fiorina and supported John McCain -- and not out of weakness, either. For me, not even Kazin's fear of a kingmaking Mama Bear carries much weight.

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