Chris Beam profiles David Brooks:

Politically, it’s clear why the White House likes Brookshe’s the persuadable opposition. “David represents to them the sensible Republican,” says Collins. “If David is convinced, they regard that as a real bi-partisan triumph.” But the special relationship is as much about style as politics. Temperamentally, Brooks and Obama could be twins. They address crises with an almost inhuman calman asset at times, but also a liability when the only proper response is emotional. On this, Brooks defends Obama. “You know, people fault President Obama for being passionless sometimes, for being a little too cold,” Brooks said on PBS NewsHour in May. “But when you have a week like this, where you’ve got the Greek situation, the oil spill, you’ve got Times Square, you’ve got floods in Nashville, I think they responded with reasonable speed, but basically with a level of calmness, which is in his nature … This is a good time to have a president like Obama, who’s just steady.”

In response, Atrios notes:

We do not live in a world with Republican senators who give a shit what David Brooks thinks.

Nope. But it remains to be seen if calm, in the long run, is stronger than anger. Is suspect it is; and Obama's temperament remains his actual strength, however it works the last nerves of liberals.

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