Robert Wright feels that "technology is weaving humans into electronic webs that resemble big brains." He doesn't think it "outlandish to talk about us being, increasingly, neurons in a giant superorganism":

I do think we ultimately have to embrace a superorganism of some kind not because it’s inevitable, but because the alternative is worse. If technological progress grinds to a halt, it will be because chaos has engulfed the world; and if we don’t use technology to weave people together and turn our species into a fairly unified body, chaos will probably engulf the world because technology offers so much destructive power that a sharply divided human species can’t flourish.

If you accept that premise, then the questions are: What sort of human existence is implied by the ongoing construction of a social brain; and, within the constraints of that brain, how much room is there to choose our fate?

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.