Jon Michaud is concerned:

People are putting aside less in savings for old age now than they have in any decade since the Great Depression. More than half of the very old now live without a spouse, and we have fewer children than ever beforeyet we give virtually no thought to how we will live out our later years alone. Equally worrying, and far less recognized, medicine has been slow to confront the very changes that it has been responsible foror to apply the knowledge we already have about how to make old age better. Despite a rapidly growing elderly population, the number of certified geriatricians fell by a third between 1998 and 2004.

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