by Chris Bodenner

John Cloud presents new research showing how evolution "has encouraged women to be more sexually active as their fertility begins to decline and as menopause approaches":

This age group 27 through 45 reported having significantly more sex than the two other age groups in the study, 18 through 26 and 46 and up. Women in their middle years were also more likely than the younger women to fantasize about someone other than their current partner. The new findings are consistent with those of an earlier Buss paper, from 2002, which found that women in their early 30s feel more lustful and report less abstinence than women in other age groups.

In both studies, these findings held true for both partnered and single women, meaning that married women in their 30s and early 40s tend to have more sex than married women in their early 20s; ditto for single women. Also, whether the women were mothers didn't matter. Only age had a strong affect on women's reported sexual interest and behavior.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.