A reader writes:

Although I agree that you have every right to be suspicious, I suggest you change tack on the Trig stuff and just keep publicizing the story exactly as Palin presents it. Because I think the facts of the story as she presents them show her in even worse light than if it were proved that Trig was not hers.

From what I’ve read the facts as she presents them show her to be either monumentally stupid, monumentally hubristic, or monumentally cavalier with another person’s life. Why, it’s almost as if she didn’t want her special needs child to be born safely.  Anyone who has ever had a child, knows someone who’s had a child or is part of the medical profession (which I would imagine covers a fairly significant proportion of the electorate) would, if they fully knew the story Palin herself recounts, either think that she was acting in a grossly irresponsible, dangerous way or else being in some way ‘economical with the truth’.  All the other women I’ve talked to who’ve been through labor and birth are far more shocked by her version of events than by the notion that she may have adopted her own grandchild.

The reason Palin hasn’t made more of a song and dance about the Trig stuff is that every version of the story reflects incredibly badly on her.

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