A reader writes:

Your dissenting reader could not have actually read the site he linked to. S/he uses it to support a possible bipolar diagnosis for Gibson, saying "his behavior - certainly his rage - is actually rather common in the manic phase of unmedicated (or self-medicated) bipolar disorder." But on the linked site it says: "Anger or rage are not typical symptoms of bipolar disorder. While certainly someone might exhibit rage while in a manic phase of bipolar disorder, it is not a symptom one could draw conclusions from." The expert continues to question the validity of a bipolar diagnosis:

Re: Gibson's self-absorption - "Focusing on one’s own feelings and how another person’s behavior affects us is not a sign of bipolar disorder."
Re: Gibson's warped perspective - "Such a discrepancy in perspective or connection to reality can be a sign of a psychotic break but it’s not a typical symptom of bipolar disorder."
Re: Gibson's threats to kill Grigorieva - "This is not a symptom of bipolar disorder, but could be connected to someone who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs."

The linked-to expert essentially comes up with a more likely explanation for all of Gibson's behaviors than bipolar disorder: drug and alcohol abuse. If you are going to argue that Gibson is bipolar, this is definitely not the website to direct people to. And so what that Gibson "admitted" to being bipolar? How better to excuse unacceptable behavior than to claim mental illness?

Another writes:

I agree about the need for police intervention. However, I do think the diagnosis of bipolar disorder is relevant to domestic abuse.  I've had relatives with bipolar disorder.  Some swung between mania and depression and were not abusive.  However, one was diagnosed as "rapid cycling mixed."  This person had periods of mania and depression and also a mixed state (simultaneously manic and depressed) that manifested itself as anger/agitation.  In the mixed state (which gradually became the more constant state), this person became viciously abusive, irrational and increased his drinking.

The correct extended-release mood stabilizer transformed him into a different person.  In fact, the transformation was so startling it made me reconsider everything I ever believed about nature versus nurture and personality.  Jail time is likely the only way to force Gibson onto the proper meds.

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