TNC is bone-tired of reporting that blames blacks for the passage of Prop 8. His larger point:

Why is the "black vote" on this issue anymore important than the youth vote, or the Catholic vote, or the labor vote, or the Latino vote, or the Baptist vote? ...There is a deeper dislogic haunting this country on race. It can't be beaten with facts, stats and arguments. The notion that black people are a problem is super-religious. It is bone-deep. It haunts everything and we can't, in this time, get loose. There needs to some fundamental root-work done here. I feel like I've spent the past few years playing with a hedge-trimmer, when what I need is a chainsaw. A diamond-grit chainsaw.

One aspect of this: a majority black city, the nation's capital, just legalized marriage equality, because of long-standing close work and dialogue between the black and gay communities, stretching back decades. And yet, media analysis of this remarkable achievement remains almost nil. I don't think we should ignore black homophobia, especially in the churches. But I agree with TNC: this is much more salient with respect to HIV transmission than marriage equality.

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