The US ambassador to Afghanistan, Karl Eikenberry, has been skeptical of our counterinsurgency strategy and of Karzai. Peter Beinart hopes he'll keep his job:

Someone needs to tell the White House that unity is not always a good thing. Sure, if you’re pursuing a sound policy, then it is helpful for everyone to get behind it. But if the policy is fundamentally flawed, disunity is actually healthy. It means that there are people in influential positions capable of seeing those flaws, and letting others know about them. In Vietnam, for instance, there was too much unity at high levels, and as a result, it was hard to bring the bad news filtering up from the field to the attention of the people that mattered. Stamping out disunity when a policy isn’t working is like stamping out chest pain in a patient on the verge of a heart attackyou’re not solving the problem, you’re only squelching the symptoms that alert you to the problem.

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