Pity The American Soccer Fans

Daniel Gross sympathizes:

Following the U.S. national team in the World Cup is a somewhat solitary endeavor in part because the scheduling doesn't lend itself to social or family watching. Unlike the Olympics, the World Cup is not scheduled or televised according to U.S. preferencesthe last time the quadrennial tournament was staged in the Western hemisphere was 1994. To watch the United States' opening game in the 2002 World Cup, I had to go to the Irish pub across from my New York apartment at 4 a.m. This year the schedule is only slightly better: this Saturday against England at 2:30 p.m. ET, Friday, June 18, against Slovenia at 10 a.m. ET, then Wednesday, June 23, at 10 a.m. ET, against Algeria. Yes, pubs and sports bars will be showing the games. But how many people will leave work, or take the day off, or skip the Little League game or pool party, to sit indoors and watch a soccer match? My guess is that when the U.S. plays England, the bars in New York and Los Angeles will be like Condé Nast in the 1990soverrun with Brits.