Balko calls the following tweets by Utah's attorney general "shameless":

A solemn day. Barring a stay by Sup Ct, & with my final nod, Utah will use most extreme power & execute a killer. Mourn his victims. Justice

I just gave the go ahead to Corrections Director to proceed with Gardner’s execution. May God grant him the mercy he denied his victims.

We will be streaming live my press conference as soon as I’m told Gardner is dead. Watch it at www.attorneygeneral.Utah.gov/live.html

Curt Hopkins frowns:

The issue here is less one of the capital punishment's morality ... and more the way this public servant chose to use the service. The tone of Attorney General Shutleff's subsequent Tweets seem strident and unprofessional. All other things being equal, that is any Twitter user's right. But not if you are representing your government, your state and its people.

As does Shani Hilton:

I admit that part of my issue with this is that I think that capital punishment is generally indefensible. But more than that, tweeting about someone's deatheven the death of a convicted murdererstrikes me as callous and not fitting for the gravity of the situation. It would be different if, say, he had tweeted a link to a press release. But to send out a message about the end of someone's life so cavalierly. It boggles.

(Osocio has more on the Amnesty ad above.)

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