Friedersdorf Counters Goldblog On Weigel

A must-read. Money quote:

In the excerpt above, Mr. Goldberg quotes an anonymous Washington Post staffer who, it should be noted, spoke disparagingly of his or her own newspaper in a conversation with a journalist from a competing media company. This source disparaged Dave Weigel, The Post, and the people responsible for hiring him, anonymously. In other words, this source's very actions imply that he or she knows The Washington Post would look unfavorably on the public airing of this opinion, but decided that lack of discretion isn't the problem so much as being stupid enough to get caught. Do journalists really want to help establish a standard whereby "stupidity" equals transparency?

-- Firing Dave Weigel incentivizes more digging into the personal opinions of journalists, and validates the idea that they should be judged on the basis of those opinions, rather than the content of their work. What's next? E-mails sent to a few people and leaked? Opinions offered at a bar over beers and surreptitiously recorded? Can I reiterate how glad I am to have moved away from Washington DC? (You should hear what I say about De Beers in private!)

-- Mr. Goldberg suggests that this episode might "lead to the re-imposition of some level of standards" at The Washington Post, suggesting that the newspaper's problem is that it employs people like Ezra Klein and Dave Weigel, who've exercised poor judgment in writing intended for a private audience. I submit that seeing these two staffers -- who are intellectually honest and talented, whatever their flaws -- as the problem at The Post is to miss the Mark Thiessen for the trees.