A reader writes:

President Obama is not changing his tune on DADT.  This has all been in the works for a long time.  In fact, a reader of your blog predicted almost exactly how this would all come about. (Allow me to gloat for a moment;  that reader was me.)

Another writes:

It seems to me that Obama has done exactly what many of us said he would do from the beginning. 

He allowed the debate to re-emerge in the public consciousness, then stood back (while attending other, equally important issues) and waited for the military leadership to take the initiative.  Like a good manager, he was patient and allowed those who are ultimately responsible for the policy’s execution to assume ownership of the problem, and its resolution.  As with health insurance reform, he didn’t allow the debate to be about him.  He let it play out more-or-less on its own, and now that the opposition is essentially spent, he’s ready to step in and act in his proper executive capacity.  This is how real, lasting change can be affected, when one is not overly concerned with receiving personal credit.

Another:

Perhaps it's just a bone to progressives, to stop us from complaining when he is forced by "pragmatism" to eliminate all the real reform in the Financial Reform bill. Or to distract us from the oil spill. Or the secret prisons. Or the ongoing wars that must be funded so we "have" to cut Social Security.  In any case, don't be surprised if the shiny toy is snatched away at the last second - Public Option, anyone?

Another:

It might have had something something to do with this - Log Cabin Republicans vs. The United States of America, the only contemporary legal challenge to DADT to succeed at the district court level. The trial starts June 14th.  If DADT does not get repealed, or if the Pentagon does not change the policy, then this suit may force the military to treat LGBs equally. Perhaps it may even get us stricter protections approaching Suspect Class. Anyway, if they repeal the statute before or during the trial, I have no doubt that the DOJ will attempt to get the suit thrown out. Hopefully the judge will not buy it, and keep the suit alive until the DADT policy (not just the statute) is off the books.

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