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Today on the Dish, the House voted to end DADT and a key Senate committee did as well. Joyner questioned the public opposition to it, lesbians harmed by the policy told their stories here and here, and we glanced at the dregs of the debate here and here. The oil leak appeared to be plugged, bloggers debated its similarity to Katrina, more images of the damage emerged, and we looked back at another big spill in the Gulf. The Dish also did due diligence on the Korean crisis.

In Palin coverage, she erected a fence to fend off McGinniss but not convicted criminals, Jack Shafer shielded the journalist, Kate Pickert partially backed Palin, and readers more so. Bernstein insisted on scrutinizing her, Timothy Egan pwned her, Ben Smith reported more juicy details, a reader requested a view from McGinniss' window, Andrew doubted Bristol, and Pareene put it best.

Rand Paul updates here and here. Noah Millman queried the paleocons, Douthat doubted their relevance, Wehner marveled at the lack of crime, Massie covered Clegg, and Friedersdorf manhandled McCarthy. More on the Israel debate here.

Critical Ralph updates here and here. Kaus campaign coverage here. Recession view from a reader here. Early Christian discussion here and Robert Frost in the Atlantic here. More on 24 here and here. Beard-blogging here and metrosexual-blogging here and here.

-- C.B.

(A man covers up his face with a U.S. flag as he participates in a rally in support of a repeal of the 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' policy March 18, 2010 at the Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC. The policy is currently under review by the Pentagon and Democrats in the House and the Senate have unveiled legislation to repeal the policy. By Alex Wong/Getty Images.)

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