Bruce Bartlett examines one of Alan Greenspan's worst ideas. Remember when Republicans were the fiscally responsible ones, especially in wartime:

Dwight Eisenhower kept in place the high Korean War tax rates throughout his presidency, which is partly why the national debt fell from 74.3% of gross domestic product to 56% on his watch. Most Republicans in the House of Representatives voted against the Kennedy tax cut in 1963. Richard Nixon supported extension of the Vietnam War surtax instituted by Lyndon Johnson, even though he campaigned against it. And Gerald Ford opposed a permanent tax cut in 1974 because he feared its long-term impact on the deficit.

Do the tea-partiers really represent the solid conservative truths of the past - or just the discredited fads of yesterday?

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