Weigel is none too pleased by Palin's attack on McGinniss:

Politicians don't have veto power over who gets to write about them, or how they research their stories, as long as they're within the bounds of the law. It's incredibly irresponsible for them to sic their fans on journalists they don't like. And that's what Palin is doing here -- she has already inspired Glenn Beck to accuse McGinniss of "stalking" Palin and issuing a threat to boycott his publisher.

This is really the ultimate example of the way Palin manipulates the press and inverts the relationship between reporters and politicians, turning the former into "stalkers," and the latter -- as long as they're Republicans or members of her family -- into saints whom no one can criticize. No one in the media should reward Palin for this irresponsible and pathetic bullying.

He follows up by defending himself against the ALL CAPS e-mails of Palin loyalists:

I have trouble, generally, understanding the status Palin has for her fans. Maybe I don't want to understand it. Many of the people who wrote me pine for the death of the media, and they do so because they are angry that a politician they like is covered critically. I would encourage them to think harder about this impulse.

Video above from a third Weigel post.

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