Kevin Williamson skewers Supply Side dogma in his piece at National Review:

There is no evidence that the [Bush] tax cuts on net produced more revenue than the Treasury would have realized without them. That claim could be true if we were to credit most or all of the economic growth during the period in question to tax cuts, but that is an awfully big claim, one that no serious economist would be likely to entertain. It’s a just-so story, a bedtime fairy tale Republicans tell themselves to shake off fear of the deficit bogeyman. It’s whistling past the fiscal graveyard. But this kind of talk is distressingly unremarkable in Republican political circles.

See the tea-party know-nothing here. Douthat applauded the piece (as did Nyhan, Yglesias, and Kain). Mark Levin responded in his usual talk-radio manner, which inspired Williamson to write:

When I first read Manzi's much-remarked-upon remarks re: Mark, I thought them unduly harsh. I am revising that opinion, just a little.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.