Sara Rubin looks into the impact of Arizona's immigration law on the nation's lettuce supply:

If [migrant] workers are reluctant to return to Arizona, growers may find themselves short on harvesters, in which case "the crops rot in the field," says Wendy Fink-Weber, director of communications for the Western Growers Association, which represents 90 percent of fruit and vegetable growers in Arizona and California. Greens, which are a finicky crop and demand near-perfect conditions, have only about a five-day harvest window after reaching maturity. Each head of lettuce is cut and packed into boxes by hand. The intensive labor associated with growing lettucea $1 billion business for Arizona and the state's highest-value cropaccounts for up to 50 percent of the cost of production.

As Second City (Colbert's old haunt) suggests in the video above, tourism could take a hit as well. Original ad here.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.